Passion

Today, our company mainly produces grapes and hazelnuts; but, besides a little fruit, we also keep bees for honey.

Mission

Our goal is to cultivate the land without exploiting it, seeking the right balance between the use of chemistry and good agronomic practices to help our work in the field, preserving the environment around us and trying to achieve high-quality products.

Winemaking

Our winemaking processes aim to reduce cellar operations and the use of sulphites to the minimum necessary to preserve the wines’ characteristics as much as possible, avoiding standardising the production but letting each vintage express its uniqueness.

Musso Farm

We are committed to producing fine wines that enrich the taste and soul

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The famous “fortresses” of the Roero in a wonderful view from our courtyard

The hills on which we grow are formed by sandy soils of marine origin, rich in fossils with veins of marl or sandstone, basically loose and even a little dry.

Among these hills are the famous fortresses, the symbol of our territory, formed by the erosion of the river Tanaro, before it changed route into the current one, between 220,000 and 150,000 years ago.

UNESCO Heritage

Our hills

A small part of the grapes we harvest on these hills are vinified in our cellar to produce high-profile wines trying to enhance the organoleptic characteristics conferred to the grapes from this particular territory.

The care of the land is essential

The vineyards

The hills where we grow are formed by sandy soils of marine origin, rich in fossils with veins of marl or sandstone, basically loose and even a bit dry.
Among these hills are the famous fortresses, the symbol of our territory, formed by the erosion of the river Tanaro, before it changed route into the current one, between 220,000 and 150,000 years ago.
A small part of the grapes that we collect on these hills are vinified in our cellar to produce high-profile wines trying to enhance the organoleptic characteristics conferred to the grapes from this particular territory.

Soil type
Sandy of marine origin
Grape varieties
Barbera, Nebbiolo, Arneis and Favorita
Winemaking
Sustainable, limiting the use of sulphites

Soil

Grapes do not require fertile soils, but instead favours the rather poor ones that differ according to their composition and texture; the soil is in fact of marine origin, with a high percentage of sand that gives this territory a high drainage capacity to rainwater, encouraging the use of agricultural vehicles even in adverse weather conditions, given the periodic rainfall in the summer months.

Climate

The climate is temperate, with the normal succession of the 4 seasons, but of course, every year is different from the previous one. Each valley has a specific micro-climate depending on their air currents and in certain periods the temperature from one valley to another may vary by a few degrees contributing significantly to the choice of crops in that environment.

Vineyard

The vineyards we grow have been planted on the hillsides exposed mainly to the south, south-east and south-west; where the vine can get the benefits of sun rays throughout the year. The highest parts of the hills are chosen because they are more ventilated and where the morning dew in the summer dries quickly, thus helping us to better defend the vines from fungal diseases.

Sun

Highly important in viticulture, because a good exposure to the sun helps the ripening of the fruit but also to fight the fungal diseases that attack the vines; the only setback that occurs in the hottest months is its power to burn and consequently to dry the bunches left exposed directly to its rays.

Cellar

This is where grapes are transformed into wine; it can be divided mainly into two parts: one located in the outermost part of the building, where it is vinified and there are various types of stainless steel tanks, then there is the part where the bottles and wine are stored, preferably located underground; the temperature is between 6° C and 16° C while the humidity is around 85%.

Grapes

The fruit of the vine that is harvested in autumn, manually in plastic boxes. In view of a wine production that focuses on quality, it seems increasingly important to be able to make wine starting from grapes in perfect condition both for ripening and for cleaning, therefore it is essential to harvest by hand.

Our history

From generation to generation

This is a typical hill settlement of the Roero, Montaldo summarises its characteristics and ingredients and identifies itself in the landscape for its tall and mighty tower. The “fortresses”, this fantastic Dantesque scenery that spans the municipalities from Pocapaglia to Montà, with precise geological connotations but also with hidden and fearful aspects that tell of “masche” and become cloaked in legend, splitting the municipal territory in two.
The western stretch, once part of a vast forest, where the “Pinus sylvestris” is still well represented, is still today rich in woods and not very inhabited.
The eastern part, with fertile fields and vineyards, formed by roundish “bric”, of rough or soft slopes, has hosted from the most ancient times the tenacious inhabitants of this secluded corner of Piedmont that face the limelight with fine wines plus fruit and vegetables that truly express their origins.
At the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries there was economic growth in the area of Montaldo; at the same time we follow the modifications of the agricultural landscape, characterised in the nineteenth century by the incision of the vine and then, at the beginning of the twentieth century, by the spread of peach, the leader of a real economic and social revolution, to which Montaldo binds its fame and fortunes, being Montaldians the first traders to reach the Swiss markets with trucks.
In the history of Montaldo, the process of agrarian transformation and economic growth is condensed, leading to the diversification of the Roero landscape compared to the Langhe.

The “ritual” of threshing by machine in focus in two beautiful images taken in 1925 in the courtyard of the brothers Musso: faces, instruments and gestures of the protagonists